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Posts tagged art

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vastderp:

lalaland1212:

theatre-whovian:

vastderp:

Meet the Mona Lisa of the Prado, the earliest known copy of Da Vinci’s best portrait. Similarity in the undersketch of the painting indicates that this was very likely painted concurrently with the original Mona Lisa, by a student of Da Vinci.
There is much controversy in the art world over the question of whether or not to clean the fragile Mona Lisa, but her sister has been restored and some fairly odd later alterations removed to show the original vibrant colors and lighting. Some details, such as the sheerness of her shawl and the pattern on the neckline of her dress, have become utterly obscured in the original, but in the restored copy they’re perfectly clear.
It blows my mind a little bit to look at these two sisters side-by-side and imagine how much vivid detail could be hiding in the Mona Lisa under 500 years of rotten varnish. 

THE COPY HAS EYEBROWS

Your response to a beautiful piece of artwork done by Leonardo Da Vinci himself is “SHES GOT EYEBROWS”. Alright. All intelligent life has been lost.

Yo Snooty McSnotwhine, the Mona Lisa’s vanished eyebrows have been the subject of debate and analysis in the art expert community for hundreds of years, long before your parents squirted water at each other from across the clown car and then honked their bicycle horns to indicate they really wanted to make a smug, insufferable little clown baby together. 

vastderp:

lalaland1212:

theatre-whovian:

vastderp:

Meet the Mona Lisa of the Prado, the earliest known copy of Da Vinci’s best portrait. Similarity in the undersketch of the painting indicates that this was very likely painted concurrently with the original Mona Lisa, by a student of Da Vinci.

There is much controversy in the art world over the question of whether or not to clean the fragile Mona Lisa, but her sister has been restored and some fairly odd later alterations removed to show the original vibrant colors and lighting. Some details, such as the sheerness of her shawl and the pattern on the neckline of her dress, have become utterly obscured in the original, but in the restored copy they’re perfectly clear.

It blows my mind a little bit to look at these two sisters side-by-side and imagine how much vivid detail could be hiding in the Mona Lisa under 500 years of rotten varnish. 

THE COPY HAS EYEBROWS

Your response to a beautiful piece of artwork done by Leonardo Da Vinci himself is “SHES GOT EYEBROWS”. Alright. All intelligent life has been lost.

Yo Snooty McSnotwhine, the Mona Lisa’s vanished eyebrows have been the subject of debate and analysis in the art expert community for hundreds of years, long before your parents squirted water at each other from across the clown car and then honked their bicycle horns to indicate they really wanted to make a smug, insufferable little clown baby together. 

(Source: vastderp-placeholder, via rivirambles)

Filed under mona lisa art interesting

9,967 notes

eschergirls:

soozarts:

karenhealey:

bisexual candycorn: thoughts on skintones

princessneeshydoomcuddles:

mulattafury:

people ask me a lot about drawing poc, more specifically “how” to do it. my kneejerk reaction is to get frustrated by it, because the answer is “just like you’d draw anything else.” it’s like the main excuse artists and writers use to not include poc in their art and in their worlds — they “don’t know how,” implying that we somehow operate by a separate set of rules, that while white characters don’t require a special set of considerations to be varied and textured and interesting, non-white characters are just an elusive series of step-by-step instructions that most creators just can’t be assed to learn or to include

i still feel that way

but

i guess i can understand that most instructive media focuses specifically on white aesthetics, proportions, skintones, and features, so there really is a need for more instructive material that is more inclusive

i can dig it

that said, there is a lot that i don’t know and am not good at and i don’t really feel comfortable trying to instruct other artists, but i’m fine with taking you through my thought processes a little

SO here’s some stuff about skintones. it’s not perfect, and there will never be a better teacher than the world around you for showing you what things look like and how to express them

first off, if you’ve ever seen me stream you know i don’t usually block in my shading with hard lines like this. i like to paint and sample colors as i go, but i’m trying to communicate my ideas about color a little better

but i’ve always used the same basic process for coloring skintones, any skintones, forever and always:

image

image

this is going to change up a little bit with directional lighting, colored lighting, environmental lighting, shit like that, but this is your basic procedure. the biggest mistake i think artists make is using skintone+black for shadows and skintone + white for highlights, and that results in pretty dull looking skintones

image

in the former image, i only varied the value of the main skin color, but in the latter i also varied the hue and saturation. doing so gives you more of an opportunity to add warmth and depth to your colors, as well as bring in environmental colors if you need to

you want to sample around the palette, use reds and purples and oranges, don’t just stay within the range of your base tone!

this applies for all colors, not just skin, but especially skin! you want skin to look alive, not plastic and dull

these same rules apply for most skintones

image

though it’s always going to be incredibly helpful to just look at references of the skintone you’re trying to draw, for little details like (for example), very dark skin, because there is a more extreme light/dark variation, will often look much more reflective than very light skin under the same lighting conditions

like so

image

because of this, you’ll want to work on using light more than shadow to describe form on dark skin

image

again, this is true of all colors, but especially skin, because you don’t want skin to look flat and lifeless!

the same rules can apply to fantasy skin tones. start with a base tone, then use warm, saturated colors to add light and shadow. sampling around the palette becomes really important for fantasy skintones if you are trying to make them look realistic/believable

image

this is especially true if, for whatever reason, you wanted to make a character with grey skin that looks alive and believable

image

OKAY THAT’S THE END OF OUR SHOW

LOOK AT THIS GOOD ASS RESOURCE MOTHERFUCKERS

Another helpful note is that darker skin tends to be shinier, which is especially easy to see on the super-dark people in the pics above. My rule of thumb is to use larger swaths of highlights on light skin, and more focused, smaller ones on darker skin.

(Though this is no more a hard-and-fast rule than anything else in art, but it’s a decent shortcut.)

Sharing another drawing tutorial for any interested. :)

Filed under reference art

44,029 notes

sosuperawesome:

Frozen Bubbles Suspended Below Abraham Lake

Abraham Lake has become world famous, especially amongst photographers. The artificial lake, which lies in the foothills of the Canadian Rockies, is home to a rare phenomenon where bubbles get frozen right underneath its surface. They’re often referred to as ice bubbles or frozen bubbles.

What causes this to happen? As photographer Fikret Onal explains, “The plants on the lake bed release methane gas and methane gets frozen once coming close enough to much colder lake surface and they keep stacking up below once the weather gets colder and colder during [the] winter season.”

Though a gorgeous sight, this incredible destination isn’t for the weak or the weary. “Even though I’ve walked on a frozen lake before, Abraham Lake made me feel completely uneasy since the lake was not covered with snow,” says Onal. “Even though the icy surface was around 8-9 inches thick, it still scared the hell out of me, not only because of the fact that I could see all the cracks…and the darkness of the lake bottom through the glassy surface, but also [because of] the deep boomy, cracking sounds coming from underneath the lake’s surface.”

Click through for image sources.

Filed under Science art photography landscape nature queued